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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
overnight. a nasa scientist explains how it could arrive unexpectedly. >>> the not so triumphant return of a >>> welcome back at 6:15. that disabled cruise that became a nightmare for passengers sits empty in mobile, alabama. a long trip homemade longer with problems towing the boat to shore. jay gray is also in mobile this morning where that ship is docked. jay, good morning to you. i cannot imagine the relief those passengers are feeling today. >> reporter: absolutely, eun. good to talk to you this morning. relief. it started with a lot excitement. adrenaline as the ship was pulled into the port here. take a look. not a much better picture than this had. an empty and idle carnival triumph. loud roars, applauses. not only from the ground but from those on the deck. they began chanting let us off. let us off. they were systematically removed from this ship. a process that initially carnival told us would take four to five hours. they finished in just over three hours. even with just one working elevator on the ship. a lot of the passengers, over 100 reunited with family members and frie
and weighs 130,000 tons. it revolves around the sun about once a year. nasa analysts say it will be closest to earth on friday at 2:25 p.m. new york time. that's 4:25 a.m. on saturday in tokyo. the analysts say the asteroid will be less than 28,000 kilometers tr earth, closer than some weather satellites. speed is estimated 1.78 kilometers per second. scientists say people in japan will be able to watch the asteroid travel southwest to west early saturday morning local time by using binoculars or telescopes. nasa says asteroids of similar size have come as close once every 40 years and collide with the earth once every 1,200 years. >>> researchers in the united states believe north korea could be preparing a new missile launch in the wake of tuesday's nuclear test. their analysis is based on recent satellite photos of a launch site in the northeast of the country. researchers at johns hopkins university looked at images of the launch site in musendanri. they compared photos taken in january with shots from three months earlier. the photos show a crane pointing in a different direction. part
-- these are not just a few disgruntled protesters. the lead nasa global warming scientist has announced it's game over for the climate if we approve the keystone pipe will be. gabe was arrested protesting the pipeline. he is nasa's lead scientist endorsed a book calling the world for ridding itself of industrialization by turning off the greenhouse gas machine. this man i interviewed about ecoterror and the pipeline, his inspiration to stop the pipeline. so, the leaders at nasa -- i call them nasa's resident ex-con -- is inspiring these people to point acts of ecoer toism, and they're against all forms of energy, which doesn't make send. if we're getting oil from democracy in canada, that's caught ethical oil, as opposed to getting from nye jeer -- nye nigeria or the middle east. the. >> neil: what is scary, the ends justify the means and if push came to shove and it meant tearing the thing down or doing god know's what, without this oil, it's a better world for us? that is crazy. >> yes, it's not about not in my backyard so much as they're worried about the extra co2 that would be emited in the atmo
. joining us now to talk all about this is our sky guy greg redfern, nasa ambassador. so we booked you to come in -- >> little did we know. >> you guys are good, top of the news. >> real good, man. how's the stock market going to do? >> we'll see. i thought the mayanna calendar was -- >> child's play. >> all right, greg, let's talk about this event. most people are just hearing about it. >> boy. >> a meteor, how big do we think it was? >> well, the latest news report said that this was probably about 10 tons and i'm thinking it's probably the size of a big suv, came in the atmosphere, they were figuring about 33,000 miles an hour and it exploded at about 18 to 20 miles or so above the earth's atmosphere. this is incredible video, incredible. so you're seeing the fireball, ball like coming in. >> it's essentially melting as it's coming into the atmosphere? >> it's blading, it's coming in, it's leaving all of this material, the earth's atmosphere, it's causing friction, it's making its surface a blade away, it's building up this shock wave in front of it and the fireball can't withstand
-meter asteroid and nasa says it will get closer at around 7:30 gmt, pm, on friday. it is not expected to hit the earth but the bad news is it could affect satellites orbiting the earth. >> satellites of this size passed by the earth once every 40 years in the last someone hit the earth was in 1908 and caused devastation in a region of russia. the next time could be 40 years, an impact could damage the world's communications system badly. the world relies on the satellite systems far more heavily than most of us realize. all of our aircraft and motor transport systems run on satellite gps and mills and many of the world's clocks are based on signals from space and most of our telecommunications and television signals, at some point, pass across satellites. if the satellite system was damaged, the world would go dark, on that cheery little mouth, --note, it will affect telecommunications. >> thank you very much, not very -- nothing very dark about you. still to come -- could liverpool fc face racial abuse when they play in russia tonight? ♪ ♪ >> at least four people have been killed
't happen, nasa assures us, is this asteroid and, oh, yes, it has a name, called da 14, they say it will not hit earth. still, you cannot ignore the buzz around this out of this world event. so we have this whole team of reporters for you and analysts to bring you this historic moment. we have a so-called asteroid hunter, former astronaut, coming on live this hour and next to talk about really what will be a historic moment as 2012 da-14 brushes by us earthlings. that will start just about ten minutes from now. right now, i want to go straight to casey wian, live in pasadena, california, nasa's jet propulsion laboratory. and i imagine the excitement is palpable. they're tracking the asteroid. tell me where it is now. >> reporter: well, it is over australia, brooke. they are very excited here at jpl. it is a very, very big day. they have been tracking this asteroid for nearly a year. today is the day it is going to get closest it is going to come to the earth as you mentioned, 17,200 miles. and right now, it is coming from the southern hemisphere, approaching the earth, basically
with our telescopes. thanks to australia and nasa we can see imagery coming in from the eastern hemisphere. astronomers worldwide are watching, excited but not too worried. >> this asteroid is half a football field long but roughly the size of a 12 story building like this. and that is big enough to wipe out a city. but scientists say that is not going to happen. the real threat here though, is to communication satellites like the ones we use at fox news. the geosynchronous at 22,000 miles around the earth. at 1:24 eastern this asteroid penetrated the plane. there is no report of a satellite hit. it must exit the plane at 2:24 eastern. but scientists do not expect any collisions to happen. this is not only one out there. they are flying near earth's orbit. astronomers and telescopes around the planet are always looking up. >> we've seen and tracked about 9,000 of them right now. and about a thousand of them are potentially hazardous. so we look at those carefully. it turns out we're safe from those for many hundreds of years. >> the 1908 event in russia which leveled, wiped out forests for
: nasa say this fireball in russia this week is believed to be the largest reporting since 1908. that's when a meteorite hit siberia, destroying an estimated 80 billion of trees. >> so why are all these encounters of a space kind of we're going to talk with jeffrey kluger. >> thanks for having me. >> when you see this coming in a group of threes, you wonder how rare is that? how unusual is it? >> not only is it not unusual but it's exceedingly common. the earth is hit with 100 pieces of debris err day, the size of basketball. every few days like a volkswagen. you should think of our planet as playing in traffic. >> it's disconcerting. >> how come we don't hear about it more often? >> because remember the atmosphere is like a wall of concrete which is why we get beautiful sky shows. it incinerated on the way down due to air friction. the problem is when the rock becoming too big to be consumed earn tirely then it bursts above ground which is call and air burst and that's what creates the technology. >> we hear that they need to shoot things down but don't have i
the second. >> the project pre sently received 5 million in funding from nasa. one in russia insisted it was not a meteor, but john considerry a new weapons of mass destruction from texas in the united states. one of president obama's favorite spots to grab a bit. ray's hell burger, reportedly owes overdue rent and court fees and a second location closed for business and president obama has visited the spot with vice-president biden and russian president med investiga med did he ha med-- >> and how does he stay so-- >> those restaurants are popular in northern virginia, it's hard to believe. >> clayton: have you even at ray's hell burger. >> tucker: i don't, but the traffic. always packed. >> clayton: and how do you have $39,000 in back rent to pay? if they're lining out the door. let's talk about a new census bureau study revealing what it means to be middle class. certainly obviously during the campaign we hear the term middle class, both sides playing to try to the middle class. the president during his state of the union used middle class eight times, but what does it mean? here i
it passes by earth tomorrow morning but you will be able to watch the historic site online. nasa will stream the approach starting at 9:00 a.m. at pacific time. the fly-by is expected to be the closest an asteroid has ever come to earth. it will be -- it will be about 17,000 miles from earth. the closest will be in indonesia. astronomers say it's about the size of a white house. >> that's a big boy. >> yeah, it is pretty big. >>> 7:54. >>> steve and i have been on fog patrol. we went on the air at 4:30 we've been watching it for hours now. steve will talk about the fog. but visibility is improving for drivers. if you are driving to the bay bridge toll plaza, that even looks a little bit better. the fog was pretty low at one point. it's backed under for about a 25 to 30-minute delay. that's your live drive time there. once you get on the bridge, another 12 to 15 minutes on the span. also, contra costa county is beginning to get slower. traffic time is way down from pleasant hill to walnut creek in danville and alamo. let's go to steve. >>> we still have areas of fog. other locations are alrea
anywhere. >> reporter: the yearly catch is shipped to nasa's johnson space center. here in the non-december crypt building number 31... >> this is the air shower. reporter: ... where you have to suit up to protect the meteorites from contamination. the precious cargo is unpacked and catalogued under the watchful eye of curator kevin rider. >> they're frozen from the time they're collected and returned all the way along the legs of the journey to get to houston. >> reporter: each sample is carefully examined and given a name based on where it was found. so we get to see a martian meteorite. >> this sample is elephant morain 79001. it's a basaltic rock from mars. >> reporter: it was studying a martian meteorite found in antarctica that led scientists to the discovery that there was once water on mars. and those these ugly ducklings may all look similar to the naked eye each meteorite has different chemical and mineral content. under a polarizing microscope, there is beautiful... they're as beautiful as stained glass windows for it's what they may some day tell us that really matters.
last year. what else could we do with the money? you could fund nasa an entire year. you could buy linkedin and even have cash left over. lori: i'm rich in love, good friends, family. don't need to spend. melissa: good for you. good for you. lori: with all the money spent on gifts today you might be surprised it hear the government might be contributing to higher costs for sweets. here is rich edson in washington to tell us why. >> we're here in washington, d.c. i walked past here last night, wow -- this is really last-minute shoppers. [inaudible] raise the price of end product. and so they are basically saying that, what happens with that end product is it boosts the price of sugar, all those import controls. the sugar industry says you have got other governments inflating the price here because they are subsidizing in their countries. this is a statement from the american sugar alliance saying much of the pressure to hand over the u.s. sugar market to foreign suppliers is driven by large food manufacturers looking to oversupply the u.s. market, depress sugar prices and boost thei
system, nasa's space exploration program, and noaa's work on necessary new satellites. these are weather satellite programs. these are sequestration's negative impacts. the diverse group of leaders here with us today is going to be attesting to this. regarding the overall economy, about six months ago we released a study conducted by dr. stephen fuller of george mason university. the study's methodology is sound and its conclusions are grim. if sequestration is going forward, it will put 2.1 million u.s. jobs at risk. these are defense and non- defense-related jobs, and include nearly 1 million small businesses. it will cost the unemployment rate to rise about 1.5%, and reduce expected gdp growth by $215 billion. $215 billion. the latest congressional budget office forecast reinforces the conclusion, that sequestration will undermine economic growth. today we are re-releasing dr. fuller's study and his analysis of the impact of impact of sequestration. let it be noted no one can say that they were not forewarned about the full consequences of this very bad policy. this morning, to emphas
damaging. nasa and others assure us that it will not. but there is some risk that it could pop into one or more satellites. and that could change everything from gps to communications. so you have to be ready for surprises. >> is this why volume is so light, even though -- >> people are in their bunkers? >> everybody's hunkering down in front of the asteroid. no, i think the volume is light, because we're right at an uptrend line. and we're either consolidating for a break-through, which would be very important, or we're stalling and pulling back. if you go back into may of 2011, we've hit this uptrend line several times. and each time we've had a pullback that was not insignificant. >> that's funny, the journal points out, we hit 14 k on february 1st, and since then, we've gone up 141 times. you've made the point before, these psychological levels are like the hard door, and the battering ram has to hit them a few times, more than once. >> it is. people have to feel more relaxed about the fact that we've gotten here, we're moving through. you know, for old-time traders, we're not only
system. nasa's space exploration program, and work on necessary new satellites. these are weather satellite programs. these are sequestration's negative impacts. the diverse group of leaders here with us today are going to be attesting to this. regarding the overall economy, about six months ago be released a study conducted by dr. stephen fuller of george mason university. the study bus methodology is conclusions are grim. it's as sequestration if going forward will put 2.1 million u.s. jobs at risk. these are defense and non- defense-related jobs, and include nearly 1 million small businesses. it will cost the unemployment rate to rise about 1.5%, and reduce expected gdp growth by $215 billion. $215 billion. the latest congressional budget office forecast -- be oak reinforces the conclusion, that sequestration will undermine economic growth. today we are read-releasing dr. fuller's study and his analysis of the impact of impact of sequestration. let it be noted no one can say that they were not for ward about the full consequences of this very bad policy. this morning, to emphas
are affected as well. for example, faa's operation of the national aerospace system, nasa's space exploration program, and no was work on necessary new satellite, weather satellite program. these are sequestration's negative impacts and they raise will be on national security. the diverse group of leaders with us today are going to be a testing to this. we are going passionate about six month ago we released a study conducted by doctor stephen forte of george mason university. the study's methodology has found and in its conclusions are grim. the study says that sequestration if it goes forward will put 2.1 million jobs at risk. these are defense and nondefense related jobs, and they include nearly 1 million small businesses. what caused the unemployment rate to rise by 1.5% and reduce expected gdp growth by $215 billion, 215 billion. the latest congressional budget office forecast, cbo, reinforces his conclusions that sequestration will significant undermine u.s. sustained growth. so, today, we are really releasing doctor for study and his analysis of these potential economic impacts of sequ
, that the nasa got to run the space program without o.m.b. folks saying you do this, you do that. are senator rockefeller cheers to the committee. i want to thank you for that. because what you did was -- you smoothed it out so that senator kay bailey hutchinson and i and we got direction for the space program three years ago that otherwise was in turmoil. that is in no small measure to what you did. i want the folks to know that is what you did and i want you to know how much this senator appreciates it. i want to ask you -- we got all of this international finance stirring. a lot of it is going to run under your authority. give me your thoughts on it. >> the international financial situation is one that we do have to watch closely. as much as we try to do our own business, we can't separate ourself from the world entirely. we can make sure our financial institutions are sound, we can make sure we run our policies appropriately. look at europe. they are the largest export partner. if they have a financial crisis that is something we have to worry about. if confirmed, i would work on but i've
started to massage and perhaps is the best way that the nasa administrator scot to run the space program without the omb folks saying you do this, you do that pursuant to directives given in the act which senator rockefeller chairs the commerce committee. and i want to thank you for that because what you did, use move the debt out so that the senator kay bailey hutchison and i could bring unanimity and we got a better option for the space program three years ago that other wise was in turmoil and that is in her no small measure to what you did. i want the folks to know that what you did and how much the center appreciates it. i want to ask you a -- we have all of this international finance stirring and a lot of it is going to run under. to give me your thoughts on that. >> senator, the international financial situation is one that we do have to watch very closely. as much as we try to do our own business we can't separate ourselves from the world entirely. we can make sure that our financial institutions are sound and that we run our policy is appropriately. europe is our largest export
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)